If your hole cards are suited, and there are two more of your suit on the board, you can most often treat any flush as the nuts since it's very rare that you will be up against another person with two hole cards of your suit. If you are drawing to a four flush on the board, however, you should be extremely careful if you do not have the ace. Poker players like drawing to flushes, and also like playing aces - these two facts combined make your odds of winning a lot lower if you chase anything but the nut flush วิธี เล่น น้ํา เต้า ปู ปลา .


Again, I'm assuming that you're drawing to the nuts, e.g. with 8-7 on a board of A-9-5-K. Any of the four sixes will give you the nuts. Unless you use both your hole cards to make the straight, however, you will not be drawing to the nuts. If the board is A-9-6-5 and you have 7-2, any 8 will give you a straight, but it's not the nut straight; someone with T-7 will have the nuts.





If you have J-T on a board of A-J-8-3, and you strongly suspect that you're up against someone with a pair of aces, you have five outs to beat him: three tens (giving you two pair), and two jacks (giving you trips). Your odds here are based on the assumption that your opponent does not have AJ or AT! This is a dangerous assumption to make, and you should realistically have better odds than 8:1 to profitably make this call to make up for the times when you are actually drawing to only half as many outs as you think you are w88 casino .


Now we've really entered a dangerous assumption. If you have KQ on a board of 8-5-2-J, and you think your opponent has made a pair of eights, but without a queen or a king kicker, you have six outs (any queen or king will make you a better pair). The odds of 6.7 - 1 only hold true if your assumption is correct. It will often be the case that you're wrong, so be very careful with this situation




If you're holding 7-7 on a A-K-9-2 board, and your only saving grace is a third 7. This is a really far fetched draw, and our only reason for including it is to show just how far fetched it is. We have (almost) never seen a pot big enough to warrant drawing to a set. Fold in all but the most extreme pot sizes ww88 .


Drawing to X outs: (46-X) / X : 1
This is the generic formula. If you have a draw other than the ones we've listed above, and want to figure out your odds for it, this is the way. Count the number of outs you have and then subtract this number from 46. Divide the result by the number of outs, and voila - you have your odds. For example, if I'm drawing both to a set and to a flush, e.g. I have reason to believe my opponent has two pair, and I have AA, with four to a flush, my outs are any ace (giving me a set) plus 9 flush cards (giving me a flush), totaling 11 outs. This gives:



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